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When was the last time you went ‘Wow’? Was it the last time you went on holiday to a somewhere beautiful? Was it listening to your favourite music? Was it seeing something you haven’t seen before?

Now, we don’t all go ‘wow!’ at the same things. Someone can be completely obsessed about their latest gadget or favourite TV programme and it means nothing to me. But some things are just impressive. Like the fact that there are more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on our planet. Or that although it’s only about 5cm long, a single Golden poison frog has enough poison to kill 10 people. Or that the human brain has enough memory to hold three million hours of TV! But the best impressive things are ones that you can linger over. Things you can enjoy. Like an incredible explosion of colour as the sun sets in a clear sky. Or your favourite meal shared with your closest friends.

This is an edited transcript of a sermon I recently gave on Genesis 1:1-2:3, the story of God creating the universe. In it, I hope you’ll see something that should make us all go wow. But first, here’s a bit of context.

Genesis is an introduction to the first five books of the Bible, which some people call the Pentateuch. These books were all written by Moses, when God was leading the people of Israel from Egypt, through the desert, to the promised land. During that time wandering in the desert, the people of Israel had no home. They were surrounded by other nations who worshipped other gods. Imagine what that felt like. Imagine all the questions that would be going round their heads: How could they know that their God is the true God? How could they know who they were?

Israel wandered around the desert for 40 years, long enough for one generation to die and another to grow up and take their place. How would they answer their children’s questions:

Daddy, why are we in the desert?

Mummy, why does God live in a tent?

Those people over there worship the sun and moon, why don’t we?

When are we going to stop moving?

Will we ever have a home?

In Genesis, God uses the stories of history to answer these questions. It tells the stories of how God created the universe. Why the world is in the broken state it’s in today. It then zooms in on the story of God’s relationship with His chosen people, finishing with how Israel ended up in Egypt in the first place. It’s a book of origins and generations, showing God’s people who they are and who God is.

We are on a journey to a promised home, just like the Israelites were, and we need to learn the same lessons that God’s people learned back then. We need to learn who we are. We need to learn who God is. So we are turning to the beginning of their story and the beginning of our story. The story of God’s relationship with His people over the generations.

But first…

The best place to start any story is at its beginning, but before we dive into Genesis 1 I want to acknowledge that the creation story found here can be a point of friction for us. Our belief in a Creator God has brought us under fire and ridicule from our culture. It laughs at the idea of an all-creating God as being unscientific, misguided, or just plain stupid.

How to interpret the creation story can be a point of friction between Christians, too. There has been plenty of debate over exactly what it means in terms of how long God took to make everything, and people who are Christians, people who know and love God, have different views. These views fit broadly between the two extremes of believing God created the universe in literally seven days, or over the course of billions of years.

This is a bigger issue for another time, but whatever you think, we must prioritise believing what God actually tells us in the Bible over what we think it says, or what the rest of the world tells us, because God’s Word is truth – not our ideas, and not other people’s opinions.

And to see what God is telling us in Genesis 1, we need to see its purpose. It wasn’t written to explain the details of how God created. Its focus is on the fact that God created everything.

God created… by the power of His word

And firstly, God created by the power of His Word.

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.” – Genesis 1:1

These are probably some of the most familiar words from the Bible, yet these 10 words are one of the biggest understatements I’ve ever seen! We are used to the world existing – of course we are. It’s been there for as long as we remember! From before we were born! But we can be so used to it being there that we forget how big a thing it is that the world is here in the first place.

Genesis says that in the beginning, the earth was formless, void, and dark. There was nothing. When we think of nothing, we often think of empty space, but really most bit of what we’d think of as being empty space are full of heat, and light, and air. In the beginning there was absolute nothingness – no substance, no light, and no order. Not just empty space, but no space to be empty!

But then we read that the Spirit of God hovered over the formless emptiness… something is about to happen.

And something does: God speaks. And the universe comes into being.

Time and time again in this chapter we read “God said… and it was so” or “God said… so God created” Have you ever stopped to think about what this means? Think about it – who can create out of nothing? I can’t make anything out of nothing – at the very least I need my body to physically put stuff together! But God spoke the universe into existence.

He said “Let there be light”, and there was light.

God said “Let there be an expanse separate from water”, and the heavens – the sky and space – were drawn apart from everything else.

God said “Let water and land separate”, and there were seas and continents.

He said “Let the earth sprout vegetation,” and the earth became lush and green.

God said “Let there be lights in the heavens to separate the day from the night” and the heart of the Sun started to burn.

He said “Let the water swarm” and “let birds fly” and “Let the earth bring forth living creatures” and we have billions of species that still fascinate us today.

He said “Let us make man…” and Adam took his first breath.

We should be utterly awestruck by God’s power.

The universe exists because God told it to exist. God is so powerful that just by telling something to exist, He doesn’t only create the outline of a thing, but all of the details of how it works and lives and moves.

With a word, God brought you into existence – every cell in your body in its place, every way that you think and feel written into your heart, every ability you have assigned and given to you. With a word! I can sing quite loudly but I can’t bring anything into existence with my voice!

Only God has that kind of power.

Isn’t that just awesome?

If God is powerful enough to command everything to exist and keep it existing with that same command, who are we compared to Him?

Who are we to make our own rules and decide for ourselves the way the world should be?

Who are we to tell Him how to behave?

Instead of trying to pretend that we are masters of our own universe, shouldn’t we be bowing to the One who has given us bodies and breath?

We should be awestruck by how God has shown His power in making the universe, and give ourselves to Him as people that He has created and rightly rules over.

God created… with purpose and order

God doesn’t just create with power. He creates with purpose and order.

We see it in how Genesis describes God creating the universe. He has six working days and makes a different thing in each. And each day has an evening and a morning – at the end of every day God stops working, and at the beginning of the next day He starts working on the next thing to be created.

He creates with purpose and in order. Each day builds on the last. God starts by separating light and darkness, the heavens and the water and the land. He then fills them. He fills space with stars, the Sun and the Moon. He gives them the job of measuring time. He then fills the earth with things that are more and more complicated. Plants sprout from the new ground. Animals soar and swim and scuttle. And finally, God creates humans. He makes us in His image, to reflect Him more than any other part of creation. And that means He made us to know Him. To have a relationship with Him.

When God has finished creating, He rests. God sits back and enjoys His creation.

Because God has created the universe to enjoy it!

God created… to enjoy

As our passage says, God creates everything, and the sixth day ends. Then it says:

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God finished his work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all his work that he had done.”  – Genesis 2:1-2

God rests. But what does this mean? Isaiah 40 says that God is the everlasting God who doesn’t get tired. So is God just not bothering to do anything any more? We know that isn’t true – God is constantly at work in the whole Bible and through history. So He can’t be sitting around, doing nothing for the rest of time because He’s finished His work and left the universe far behind on His desk at the office. What is He doing?

Look at Genesis 1:31:

And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good…” – Genesis 1:31a

The last thing God does before He rests is to look at all He has made and declare it to be “very good”. God sits back, not to have a snooze, but to take pleasure in His finished work. To enjoy it. To spend time enjoying it.

God delighted in His creation! God was happy with it. We can think of God being stern and serious and maybe a bit scary, but God is a joyful God. He takes pleasure in what He has made. And He intends for us to enjoy the universe too. God has commanded us to work as He worked, with six days of labour and one of special rest, as it says in the Ten Commandments in Exodus 20. This isn’t just giving us a working week, it’s giving us rest, too.

As God’s people today, we should have one day a week where we stop our work. Where we leave the office behind. Where we leave the coursework on the shelf. Where all the chores, and the life admin, and anything else that distracts us gets put on hold. So that we can enjoy the universe God has made. But far more import than that, so we enjoy what God made us for – relationship with Him. So make time to enjoy God and enjoy His creation. Make time to enjoy Him as part of God’s people together – that’s what church is for.

I’m not saying that the world is perfect now. I know it isn’t. There are parts of it that are hard and confusing and painful. But God made the universe to be good. And although creation has been corrupted by our sin, it still hasn’t lost that goodness. It can still be enjoyed, and we can still delight in the smell of flowers, the roar of the sea, a fantastic lunch when you’re absolutely starving.

Creation hasn’t just kept its goodness now. One day it will be made completely new again. In Colossians 1 it says that on the cross Jesus reconciled everything to Himself. He dealt with our sin, that had broken our relationship with God.  Jesus made a way for creation to be made new, and for us to be made new to live in that creation. To live in a world that is better than what we see now because it won’t be twisted by evil any more. A world that will be everything that God has made it to be. Where we will truly enjoy God and the universe at its best without anything getting in the way. But the only way we will get there is if we believe in God and trust in Jesus as our Saviour.

In God’s Word today we have seen that God created everything. He created by the power of His word. He created with purpose and order. And He created the universe for Him to enjoy, and for us to enjoy it with Him, because creation is good and we are made to know God. And if you trust God and believe in Jesus, you can look forward to this universe being made perfect again in the future.

So the next time you see something that makes you go ‘Wow!’ remember how it got there in the first place.

Remember that God spoke it into being.

Remember that God made it to be good and that you can enjoy it.

Remember that if this world feels painful and confusing, it will one day be made perfect, and if you’re a Christian you will enjoy it forever.

But most of all, remember that you are made to enjoy creation with God, in relationship with Him. So if you don’t know God, why not choose today to believe in Him? To become what you were made for?

 

If you want to listen to the audio recording, it can be found on the St Mary’s website.

When was the last time you lived without light? Because we have electricity in our homes we can live with the lights on 24 hours a day if we want, although it wouldn’t be very eco-friendly! Light is useful. Plants use it to generate food, we use it to see, to have the internet, to watch DVDs.

But besides being useful, light is beautiful. White light is made up of a whole load of different colours of light. When it shines through a prism it refracts, which means it is split into all the different colours that make up white light and looks really pretty like this:

prism-DSCN4982

(C) Andrew Davidhazy

This isn’t something you only see in a school science lesson, it’s what makes gemstones sparkle. Diamonds are especially good at it. When white light goes through a well-cut diamond, it bounces around inside it and shines out in different colours from its different facets, beautifully sparkling and shining. One beam of white light, shining through a diamond, gives off a whole host of different colours through its different facets:

20160305000536-diamond

(C) Shutterstock.com

Not only that, but things that light shines through are really useful – things like light bulbs and windows and magnifying glasses. They are useful because light shines through them to do something, like make something look bigger, or find your way around in the dark, or let you see through a wall.

At my church we’ve been going through a sermon series about the Holy Spirit and the gifts that He gives. Before this sermon, we’d seen that only the Holy Spirit can make us spiritually alive and believe in Jesus. We learned that the Spirit’s main goal is to point people to Jesus and glorify Him. We also learned that the Spirit works in Christians to transform us and grow godly character and behaviour in us.

In this sermon, we moved from looking at what the Holy Spirit does in us to what He does through us. In 1 Corinthians 12:1-11, we’ll see where they come from, who they are given to, and why. Have a look at 1 Corinthians 12:7: “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” Spiritual gifts are given by the Holy Spirit, to every Christian, for the sake of others. Let’s pick that apart:

Given by the Holy Spirit

Paul wrote the book of 1 Corinthians to the church in Corinth to correct wrong behaviour in their life as a church together. This passage is part of a number of chapters about what worship together should look like. Before he launches in to talking about spiritual gifts, he reminds the Corinthians where their relationship with the Holy Spirit began:

Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers, I do not want you to be uninformed. You know that when you were pagans you were led astray to mute idols, however you were led. Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking in the Spirit of God ever says “Jesus is accursed!” and no one can say “Jesus is Lord” except in the Holy Spirit.”

1 Corinthians 12:1-3

It is only by the Holy Spirit that someone can say “Jesus is Lord”. This doesn’t mean that someone who isn’t a Christian can’t say a combination of “Jesus” “is” and “Lord” in that order, but that only the Holy Spirit enables us to truly mean it when we say it, to truly place Jesus as Lord over our lives. This is the Spirit making Jesus known to us and giving spiritual birth to us, making us spiritually alive, as we saw a couple of weeks ago. When we become Christians the Holy Spirit actually comes and lives in us. Earlier in 1 Corinthians, in chapter three verse 16, Paul says “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?” Think about that – God’s Holy Spirit, that hovered above the unformed waters before creation, who raised Jesus from the dead, lives in you.

And the Holy Spirit gives us spiritual gifts. Just quickly skim verses 4-11 – different gifts are described, but they are all given by the “same Spirit” (v4), “through the Spirit” (v8), by “the one Spirit” (v9), and are all “empowered by one and the same Spirit” and apportioned by Him (v11). As verse seven says, “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” a “manifestation” is something that clearly shows or embodies something that you can’t see, so these “manifestations of the Spirit” are visible signs of the Holy Spirit living in someone and working through them. A diamond doesn’t shine because it generates light, it shines because light from somewhere else shines through it. So the gifts that the Holy Spirit gives aren’t about an abstract sense of spirituality where we’re given power to become some kind of demigod. No, the Spirit empowers us with gifts so that He can do something through them. We’ve seen before that the Spirit’s main concern is to point people to Jesus and glorify Him. So a gift isn’t spiritual because it looks supernatural. It is spiritual because it is given by the Spirit to point others to Jesus.

The Spirit also chooses who gets given what. Verse 11 says He “apportions to each one individually as he wills.” Sometimes we can downplay who the Holy Spirit is and end up reducing Him in our minds to merely a force sent from God. But He is a Person in the Trinity. He is God, and He has sovereign will to give gifts as He sees fit.

 Given to every Christian

To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit…” [v7a]. The Holy Spirit gives every Christian spiritual gifts. He doesn’t assign them to us because we earn them, but because of God’s grace. He doesn’t see someone and think they are a good enough Christian to be given the gift of wisdom, or healing, or whatever. No, the gifts the Spirit gives are given to us as part of the renewed relationship that we have with God because Jesus bought it for us on the cross. This means that every single Christian in this room has spiritual gifts. If you are a Christian, there are visible ways in which the Holy Spirit has equipped you and works through you.

Not every gift the Spirit gives is the same in everyone. As it says in verses 4-6, there are varieties of gifts given by the Spirit. Paul gives a list of some of them a bit further down the paragraph: utterance of wisdom and knowledge, God-given wisdom and insight in particular situations that’s beyond the ordinary. A special equipping of faith to see beyond circumstances to trust in God. The working of miracles: God manifesting His power in supernatural acts. The ability to distinguish between spirits: discerning whether something someone says or does comes from the Holy Spirit’s work, Satan’s activity, or their own sinful human nature. The other gifts of healing, prophecy and speaking in and interpreting tongues were covered later in this sermon series (you can find the sermons here). All the things that Paul lists here are impressive, but it isn’t a definitive list of Spirit-given manifestations of Himself. In verse 28 Paul mentions apostles, teachers, helping and administrating. In Romans 12:6-21 he talks about teaching, encouraging, generosity, leading and being merciful. In Ephesians 4:11-15 he describes evangelists too. In 1 Peter 4:10-11 Peter talks about speaking God’s words to people and serving others.

There are a whole load of different gifts that we can be given. It all comes from the same God, but will look different in each person, like one beam of light coming in to a diamond shines out through its different facets in different colours.

Given for the common good

Having these abilities in and of themselves is not why we have them. “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” (v7) We are not given these gifts to keep to ourselves and think how great and “spiritual” we are. No, the whole purpose of the Holy Spirit giving every Christian manifestations of Himself is so that we use them for the good of other people. The church that Paul is writing to here had a problem with arrogance and disunity. They saw their meetings together as a way to show off how spiritual they thought they were. But verse 7 says there is no place for that in the Church. Looking back at verse 4, it says there are varieties of gifts and varieties of service and activities.

A magnifying glass is no use if it holds on to light. The whole point of it is that light goes through so it can be used to help someone see something better. And what use is a completely blacked-out window? If you cover a light bulb, the bulb gets the light but it’s no good to anyone keeping that light to itself! If the Holy Spirit gives you a certain gift, enjoy that you have it but realise that you have been given it in order to serve others with it. If the Spirit gives you the ability to speak wisely and knowledgeably, it is so that you can share that wisdom with others. If He gives you extraordinary faith, it is to encourage others to trust Him, too. If working miracles, it’s to serve others and show God’s power, not your prestige. If you are gifted in discernment, it’s to help others see what is from God and what isn’t.

It’s no mistake that straight after these verses come a passage about the Church being made up of many unique but united parts, like a body. Because just as God has created us all unique, by His Spirit He has equipped us all uniquely to serve others in the context of the Church. Like the facets of a well-cut diamond shine out all the different colours in white light, as each of us uses the gifts that the Spirit has given us for the sake of others in the church family we will show each other a beautiful spectrum of who God is.

Shining bright

In this passage we’ve seen that the Holy Spirit gives gifts and abilities to every Christian so that we use them to serve others. So how should we respond?

Firstly, we should be filled with wonder at what God does in and through us. His Spirit gives manifestations of Himself to each and every Christian. If you truly believe that Jesus is Lord, you have Spirit-given gifts. Not because of whether you think you’re a good Christian or not, but because the Spirit has enabled you to be a Christian. So if you struggle to believe that you have something to contribute to your church family, be encouraged – you do. The gifts you have been given are manifestations of the Spirit. God’s Spirit visibly lives in us! So let’s be in awe of the God who chooses to put His Spirit in us to make us more like Him, and empowers us to do things that reflect Him.

Secondly, we must be humble. Because gifts of the Spirit are gifts of God’s grace, we must remember that they have been assigned to us by God. We don’t spiritually “level up” to get them, and they aren’t skills to be learned and collected. No one of us is better or worse than another because of the particular set of gifts that God has given. If you do have a particular gift it isn’t a thing that you own, like a spiritual multi-tool that fixes other people’s problems and makes you feel good because you’ve Done It Yourself. It’s a way that God works through you, not you work to be like God.

We should also humbly depend on God to give us gifts and empower us to serve. If you long to have a particular gifting, pray for it! If you can recognise gifts in yourself, praise God for them and ask Him to show you how you can serve others with them. If you see them in someone else, thank God for them and also encourage that person in using their gifting.

Finally, since we have been given spiritual gifts to use to serve other people, we should use them to serve other people! This could be telling people on the other side of the world who have never heard the Gospel the good news that Jesus’ life, death and resurrection means that we can be right with God. Or it could mean telling the people who live next door or share an office with you. It could be sacrificially giving up time and energy to help a brother or sister in Christ who is suffering. It could be praying persistently for people, situations or countries that so desperately need God to act in or for them. It could mean spending your life working hard to lead a church. It could mean bringing up your children to know and love God and what it looks like to live as one of His people. Or standing up for truth when it hurts, or serving week after week on the welcome team, or a well-timed humble word of correction, or welcoming someone you don’t know… there is no end to what this practically looks like, because God is endlessly creative in not just how He has made us as individuals but also in how He empowers us to work for others’ good and His glory. Every single Christian has God-given ways that He has empowered them to serve, so let’s serve each other with what God has given us in that He has equipped us to do it. And as we serve, let’s humbly depend on God and serve in His strength and power, so that we will point people to Jesus and not ourselves. Let’s choose to use what the Holy Spirit has given us for the sake of other people, so God will show the full spectrum of His glory through us.

The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun, which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber, and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy. Its rising is from the end of the heavens, and its circuit to the end of them, and there is nothing hidden from its heat.

Psalm 19:1-6 (ESV)

How would you describe beauty? I could point you to a picture of a stunning sunset or get you to listen to The Lark Ascending, one of the most stunning pieces of classical music I’ve ever heard. But I don’t think I could straight up tell you what to look for. What about majesty? It’s how we describe kings and eagles and lions. But I can’t define it in the same way that I’d define what something physical like a book is (the OED definition is “a written or printed work consisting of pages glued or sewn together along one side and bound in covers”, in case you were interested). I have to use a concrete thing to communicate to you about an abstract thing.

Psalm 19 is about two ways in which God is revealed, through creation and through His Word, and this time I’m going to focus on the first six verses. So let’s see what this Psalm has to say about creation; how it, a concrete thing, displays the glory of the God who made it, and how, when we look at the natural world around us, our hearts are led to look beyond what we see and worship the God it points to.

The first thing we see as we look at these six verses of Psalm 19 is that nature declares God’s glory. The psalm bursts open with this! When he was writing this, David wasn’t making a cold observation; you can sense his wonder as he passionately exclaims:

“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world.” (v1-4b)

The first thing you notice as you read this is how much communication is going on: by the heavens and the sky, day and night. It isn’t a small memo casually slipped onto your desk, either: they are declaring, proclaiming, pouring out speech, all day, all night, all over the world! And what is this message that the heavens are shouting to all and sundry? God’s glory. The goodness, the perfection, the purity of who God is in all His wisdom and power and knowledge and love and holiness and so much more! The natural world around us is communicating.

It communicates God’s glory because it is created by Him. When I was at school, I used to really enjoy art lessons. I loved painting things and making things, especially when we got to use things you don’t get to use every day. Like clay, because then you get to make stuff in 3D rather than endless drawings of random fruit and veg. It was great fun to mould it, to give it shape with my own hands rather than a brush. And to finish proudly with something that looked… close enough to the idea I had in my head, covered in fingerprints and lines that the ridges on my hands had made, and the occasional nail-mark that I’d forgotten to smooth over. The creation bore the marks of its maker. And – much better than my attempts at creativity – God’s great masterpiece, the universe, bears the fingerprints of its Maker. It reflects Him because He made it.

Verses 5-6 give an example of what we see in creation. In the UK, the sun is often a thing of myth, especially in our long and overcast winters; but when David was writing he was in Israel, where the climate is hot, and the sun would have been far easier to spot in the sky!  Let’s look at how he describes it:

In them [the heavens] he [that is, God] has set a tent for the sun, which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber, and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy. Its rising is from the end of the heavens, and its circuit to the end of them, and there is nothing hidden from its heat.” (v4c-6)

The sun has been given a place in the sky by God: a home, and a course to run (v4c, 6). And our closest star doesn’t struggle along as if it’s dragging its feet; no, it is like a groom going to his wedding, the happiest day of his life, all dressed up and bursting with happiness. It is like an athlete doing what they have trained for, muscles singing and heart thundering with the thrill of the race. The sun, as David describes it here, shows God’s glory as being exhilarating! And other parts of the physical world show other things about God’s glory.

This means that the physical world is good. As we want to be people who imitate God, and resist the temptation that comes so naturally to our human nature, we can fall into the trap of forgetting that the world we live in is made by God, and God made it good. We can focus on crucifying the passions and desires of the flesh, as it says in Galatians 5:24, and this is a good thing to do; but we can do it so religiously that we either don’t allow ourselves to enjoy the good things in this world, or don’t realise that God has made these things to display His glory – the nourishing taste of good food, the sweet pleasure of a well-performed symphony, the reassuring warmth of a hug from your mum.

The fact that God displays His glory through His creation also means that we have no need to worry about science. I firmly believe that you can be a scientist and be a Christian, and I think that people like Richard Dawkins who famously wield science as the antidote to God are wrong. At the end of the day, science is about discovering how the universe works. So what we find out won’t disprove God, because God doesn’t lie (Numbers 23:19), and He wouldn’t deceptively make something that disproves Himself. As we discover more about our universe, it’ll only show us more about His creative power and glory! And for those of us who are involved in discovering more about the world, it’s important to not lose our sense of wonder as we look at what God has made. We shouldn’t let rampant rationalism steal away our joy and reduce nature to a mere set of rules and processes. The heavens declare God’s glory; all the burning balls of gas that we call stars hang in space because they are held by God’s sustaining power.

But God displaying His glory through creation also means that we should look after it. When He created us, God gave us the task of looking after the world (Genesis 1:28-30). Can we say that we do that today? Do we care for our planet as the God-given reflection of His glory that it is, or do we use it as if exploiting our resources won’t have any long term effects? This is something that can be harder to bear in mind as our cultural mind-set has become separated from the land that we live in and depend on; we can forget that the food we eat is grown in the ground, that our electricity comes from energy released by burning coal and oil (mostly), that our cars aren’t carbon neutral. So part of our worship involves looking after our planet.

We’ve seen that creation displays the glory of God because He made it. The second thing we see in Psalm 19 is that creation is a hint of the true God. It is God’s glory that the heavens declare. Nature reflects Him because He actively chooses to communicate through it. Romans 1:19-20 says that “… what can be known about God is plain to them [that is, humanity], because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have clearly been perceived, ever since the creation of the world.” God has given us something concrete to describe something we can’t see ourselves. His glory is something that we cannot see and survive to tell the tale [Exodus 33:20] because God is so pure and holy and we are so imperfect. So God doesn’t just communicate what He is like in words, like what we see in the Bible. God created a physical world that displays His glory, and He gave us the ability to see it, and taste it, and hear it, and touch it. The smell of cooling rain on a hot summer’s day. The quiet splendour of a winter’s morning where the sun gently rises in pastel hues of pink and orange.  The ferocity of a storm, where the rain pummels roofs and roads, thunder roars over our heads, and the sky is split by great flashes of lightning. All of these hint at how life-giving, how beautiful, how powerful God is!

But these hints can be misinterpreted – look at how many religions throughout history have worshipped nature or gods representing the sun or the sea or animals. They’re seeing the glory shown in nature, but are missing the point. And I think this could be one reason why Psalm 19 isn’t just about creation. The rest of it is about God’s “law” – God’s commands and everything else God wants us to know about Himself. It’s basically His Word, the Bible as we know it today. Henry will talk about it in much more details about it next week, but today it’s important to know that the glory creation displays in colour and sound and substance, the Bible specifically attributes to God, and only God.

When we marvel at the vastness of the sky and open ocean, God says “He who made the Pleiades and Orion, and turns deep darkness into the morning and darkens the day into night, who calls for the waters of the sea and pours them out on the surface of the earth, the LORD is his name” [Amos 5:8]. When pride gets the better of us and we start thinking we have the right to tell God what to do, He says “Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth? Tell me, if you have understanding. Who determined its measurements – tell me, if you know! Or who stretched the line upon it? On what were its bases sunk, or who laid its cornerstone, when the morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for joy?” [Job 38:4-7] When life gets too much, God points us to the star-filled night and says “Lift up your eyes and see: who created these? He who brings out their host by number, calling them all by name, by the greatness of his might, and because he is strong in power, not one is missing… He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might he increases strength.” [Isaiah 40:26].

God uses creation to points beyond itself to who He is. So get out there! Walk round the lake in Wollaton Park. Climb mountains! Go rockpooling! At least, watch a David Attenborough documentary! One of the sad things of our modern world is how we are separated from nature. We work in office blocks away from the sky and grass and trees; we stay up late in artificial light, not noticing the moon and stars and the soft evening breeze; our food comes from the supermarket rather than fields watered by rain and ripened by the sun. Nature becomes something to be controlled and bent to our will, rather than something to delight in. And so we can be missing out on something that’s really refreshing for us, and spiritually refreshing as well as emotionally or physically refreshing. The beauty of the natural world shows God’s glory, and God’s glory is transforming [2 Corinthians 3:18].

And while you are being refreshed, remember Who it is that nature points to. Remember that God is the God who made everything, things we can and can’t see, mountains, DNA, rainforests, atoms, supernovas. This is our God! He is our loving Father and awesome Saviour and invincible Lord. And delight in the world God has created because it points to Him!

As we’ve looked at the first few verses of Psalm 19, we’ve seen that creation displays God’s glory and point to Him as the better reality of what it reflects. But as I’ve been talking, I wonder how easily you believe what I’ve said? Have you taken it all in, thinking “Yes, the world is wonderful! It’s so obvious how great God is!” Or has a seed of doubt, a shadow, passed through your mind? Do you wonder whether what I’ve said really is true, because as far as you’ve seen nature isn’t all sweetness and light?

I’ve just finished a Masters degree in Clinical Microbiology. Over the last year, I’ve studied a whole load of infections and what causes them. Besides seeing how fantastic our immune systems are and how sneaky some bugs can be, I’ve realised that viruses, bacteria and fungi aren’t intentionally horrible. It isn’t like the Ebola virus decided that one day it would destroy humanity and started infecting people in Africa. Infection is an intrinsic part of how these bugs survive, reproduce and even flourish. You can’t separate their life cycle and the effect they have on the people they live in. The same goes for all infections. It’s a tragic reality. So can a good God really exist when the universe He has made contains disease and disaster and wasps?

I don’t often agree with Richard Dawkins, but he puts the issue quite well:

“The total amount of suffering per year in the natural world is beyond all decent contemplation. During the minute that it takes me to compose this sentence, thousands of animals are being eaten alive, many others are running for their lives, whimpering with fear, others are slowly being devoured from within by rasping parasites, thousands of all kinds are dying of starvation, thirst, and disease. It must be so. If there ever is a time of plenty, this very fact will automatically lead to an increase in the population until the natural state of starvation and misery is restored. In a universe of electrons and selfish genes, blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won’t find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice. The universe that we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil, no good, nothing but pitiless indifference.”

[Richard Dawkins, River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life]

Dawkins, and others, use this as a reason not to believe in God. But how should we deal with the fact that the world is messed up? That sometimes it does look like there’s no justice, no reason behind all the suffering we see, and surely no loving God behind it all! Turn with me to Romans 8:19-23. It says:

For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. And not only the creation, but ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.

Creation is groaning. Our whole universe has been made subject by God to decay, to suffering, to futility. Why? Why would an apparently good and loving God force something He created good to submit to this horror? Because of sin. Genesis 3 talks about the first time humanity rebelled against God, which has had consequences that have spun through our entire history. Our relationship with God and with each other was broken, and creation was plunged into misery. Humanity was thrown out of the garden that was a place of safety and provision, and the world became a place where life would be hard and filled with suffering. All that Dawkins was talking about in that quote, the gruesome destruction of life to feed life, the starvation, the misery; these all show what a world without God is like. They show how horrendous rejecting God is, and the appalling consequences of sin. God is so completely perfect that sin is repulsive to Him, so as we are disgusted by the misery we see, creation is still displaying God’s glory by enabling us to understand His hatred of sin.

But, as verse 20 says, creation was subjected to futility in hope. As we have been shown the horror of sin to a holy God, He will show His glory again. Did you notice, v21 says that creation was subjected to futility in hope “that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God.” There will be a day where God will free creation from the decay-ridden state it’s in and transform it into a place of peace with no death or mourning or crying or pain, as it says in Revelation 21:4. Creation will be at peace; wolves and lambs, calves and lions, children and cobras will be safe to put together because they won’t harm each other [Isaiah 11:6-9]. And this was made possible by Jesus’ death on the cross, where God reconciled to Himself all things [Colossians 1:20]; and so those of us who believe in Him, who are called God’s children, have an incredible future ahead of us. We and creation will have freedom and glory [v21] where we shall be so transformed that nothing gets in the way of us truly delighting in God and being satisfied in Him!

Yet for now, we see the cruelty of nature. Creation shows God’s glory, but creation is tainted by the corruption that stains us all. And this is why God’s Word, the Bible, is so important. Because it addresses the problem of our spoiled world and shows us what true goodness is. It says that we’re right to be appalled at death and suffering, but it won’t last forever. And it says that a holy and glorious God has made a way for us to be renewed, and made right with Him, at great cost to Himself. So let the darkness of this world drive you to the refreshing Light of Jesus. If you aren’t a Christian today, I really do hope that you’ll come to know this great God.

If you are a Christian, be encouraged! Look around you at what God has made! And delight in the fact that God, who is so glorious and powerful, is our God! One day we will see Him as clearly as we see the earth around us, and hear His voice as clearly as we hear a thunderstorm. One day we will be freed from all death and pain, and the universe will be transformed into something more incredible than it is now!

As we’ve looked at the first bit of Psalm 19, we’ve seen that the natural world around us declares God’s glory. It shouts it out for all to hear. And the glory we see in creation is the glory of God Himself – every speck of beauty, every hint of majesty points to the Lord its Maker. Still, this world is broken because God has subjected it to decay so that we would see sin for the monster it is and turn to Him. And one day God will renew the universe, and transform us, into something perfect and a people who will completely enjoy Him forever. So as we see the splendour of the world around us, let’s worship the God who made it! And as we see the misery of its fallen nature, let’s be driven to turn away from the corruption of sin to the God who will make all things new.

November is moving fast, and Christmas is approaching! Time to think of what presents to buy for friends and family! I quite like planning what to buy for the people I know well enough to have a good idea of what to get them, but some people are harder to buy for than others. At times like these the invention of vouchers is something invaluable. I tend to always get vouchers from a member of my family at Christmas, and it’s quite fun choosing what to spend them on. I enjoy the satisfaction that comes from getting a good bargain. But although I want to get the most out of what I spend, I know it isn’t worth spending money on something that’s cheap and low-quality. It’s far better to exchange my shiny pieces of paper for something that I know that I’ll enjoy for a while. You wouldn’t redeem something broken or old or tatty with your vouchers, would you?

You might be wondering why on earth I’m talking about what I’ll be spending my Christmas money on, but I think that as we go through the short and sweet chapter of Hosea 3 we’ll find something surprising. We’ll see a God who spends big on something that we might think is a rip-off, but something He thinks is worth every last bit of what He paid.

In Hosea 1, God describes Israel’s relationship with Him like that of an unfaithful wife. They were a people who keep on forsaking God for idols, and God says He’ll judge Israel because of their spiritual adultery. God originally warned against forgetting Him a few generations before in Deuteronomy 8, yet we see in Hosea 2 that Israel did just that, and left God her husband for the empty promises of other gods. So God says He’ll take away everything she has to bring her to her senses. He will then allure His unfaithful wife, and give back all He has taken away, and Israel will once again call Him her husband. Not only will God restore their relationship but He will make it a closer, deeper, purer one. An eternal one.

In chapter 3 we take a short break from God’s message to Israel to see what is happening in Hosea’s life. This is the last time we hear about Hosea himself in the book, and again God uses it to show profound and powerful truths about His relationship with, and His plans for, His people. In this passage it involves two actions: redemption and restoration. This won’t be an easy passage to look at. We will be challenged. We will be humbled. But we will also be allured by the unrelenting love and astonishing forgiveness of our God. A God who willingly redeems a broken people at a cost much greater than a gift card.

So let’s look at the passage:

The LORD said to me, “Go, show your love to your wife again, though she is loved by another and is an adulteress. Love has as the LORD loves the Israelites, though they turn to other gods and love the sacred raisin-cakes.”

So I bought her for fifteen shekels of silver and about a homer and a lethek of barley. Then I told her, “You are to live with me for many days; you must not be a prostitute or be intimate with any man, and I will live with you.”

For the Israelites will live for many days without king or prince, without sacrifice or sacred stones, without ephod or idol. Afterwards the Israelites will return and seek the LORD their God and David their king. They will come trembling to the LORD and to his blessings in the last days.”

Redemption

Firstly, the passage describes redemption. The chapter begins with God giving Hosea some instructions: ‘The LORD said to me, “Go, show your love to your wife again, though she is loved by another and is an adulteress. Love her as the LORD loves the Israelites, though they turn to other gods and love the sacred raisin-cakes.” So I bought her for fifteen shekels of silver and about a homer and a lethek of barley.’ (v1-2)

Gomer has left Hosea. Not only has she left him, but she has left him for another man while still being his wife. By Old Testament law, Hosea was well within his rights to drag both Gomer and her lover to the city gate to be stoned to death. And, let’s be honest, wouldn’t you sympathise? If the man, or woman, you loved, you had married, you had given all that you had to, you had looked after, who had promised to be with you for life, one day turned around and said “Sorry, I’m in love with someone else” upped sticks and left – wouldn’t you be angry? Wouldn’t you be hurt? Would you ever want to see them again? It’s incredibly painful when anyone you’re close to hurts you, and all the more for a marriage, a relationship that’s meant to be one of intimacy and close trust.

Yet what does God tell Hosea to do? “…Go, show your love to your wife again, though she is loved by another and is an adulteress. Love her as the LORD loves the Israelites…” (v1) God is using Hosea’s life as a picture of His relationship with Israel. Can you see the parallel here? “Go, show your love to your wife… though she is loved by another and is an adulteress. Love her as the LORD loves the Israelites, though they turn to other gods and love the sacred raisin-cakes.” (v1) God is saying that just like Gomer left Hosea for another man, Israel has abandoned her divine Husband for the idol Baal, and loves not God, but raisin-cakes, things used in rituals. She does not love God Himself, but desires things, and has turned to other gods to give her those things. And God, being holy, righteous, and just, has every right to condemn Israel to destruction for her unfaithfulness.

Yet He doesn’t do that. If you remember, in chapter 2 God didn’t declare intentions to annihilate Israel, although He would punish her. He said He would love her and woo her and betroth her to Him for ever. And as God decided to show His love in restoring His idolatrous people, He asks Hosea to do the same for his wife. And verse 2 says that that involves buying Gomer back. The price is fifteen shekels of silver and one and a half homers of barley. Some interpreters think this adds up to thirty shekels of silver – this was how much it cost to buy a slave’s freedom. Hosea doesn’t say why she needs to be bought back, but Gomer’s return came at a price. And the fact that Hosea had to make up the difference with barley shows He couldn’t pay in cash. It was costly for him.

God didn’t give Hosea the option of backing out of his relationship with his wife, because God is uncompromising in His relationship with His people. He would not give up on Israel, although abandoning them would save Him the pain of their unfaithfulness; and He wouldn’t settle for anything less than for them to call Him their husband. The love that God asks of Hosea is but a taste of God’s own love for His people – vast, relentless, eternal.

But was it worth it? Hosea knew that Gomer was adulterous right to the core, it was why God told him to marry her in the first place. Wouldn’t Gomer just keep on running to her lovers? Wouldn’t Israel just turn away again? It’s what they had been doing for generations! It wasn’t enough to merely remove the wife from slavery. No, she would have to change as well.

 

Restoration

Therefore, after redemption the second act we see is that of restoration. After Hosea has bought Gomer, he says to her, “You are to live with me for many days; you must not be a prostitute or be intimate with any man, and I will live with you.” (v3) This sounds a bit cryptic, but Hosea is saying that she is to remove herself from the temptation of adultery. She is to live with Hosea as his wife, yet since sexual intimacy was her downfall, she is not to sleep with any man – including Hosea – for a time. Gomer had to get out of the habit of unfaithfulness so that she could be a faithful wife. And then Hosea would fully be a husband to her again.

Why did Hosea do this? “For the Israelites will live for many days without a king or prince, without sacrifice or sacred stones, without ephod or idol.” (v4) God will remove from Israel the things that were leading them astray. They weren’t all bad things in themselves. It wasn’t wrong for Israel to have a king, to offer sacrifices, or to have objects of worship. These were all good things. But Israel’s rulers had led them astray, and more often than not had rejected God. Sacrificial offerings were something ordained by God, and in previous years God’s people had set up memorial to remind them of what God had done for them. Yet the people were now sacrificing to other gods and making idols in honour of them. Even ephods, parts of the system of worship that God had set up through Moses, had become idols. In fact, the history of the northern kingdom of Israel was founded on idolatry and a broken relationship – they rebelled against King David’s grandson and set up their own king and made their own rival religion. Israel was riddled with idolatry! Like a shopping trolley with a dodgy wheel, they kept veering away from God and running in the wrong direction.

Like Gomer, Israel needed to be removed from the things that were leading them astray. It would be hard: They would be conquered, and their system of worship would be removed. Yet instead of being an unloving thing for God to do, this purging is a part of His love. God will remove the very pillars of Israel’s culture, but He will not remove Himself. And He knows that for Israel this will prove to be ultimate gain: “Afterwards the Israelites will return and seek the LORD their God and David their king. They will come trembling to the LORD and to his blessings in the last days.” (v5) The people of Israel needed to have these things removed so that they would return to God. So that they would see that it was the Lord who gave them everything, the Lord who heard their prayers, the Lord who kept them safe – not anything else. They would turn to God again, remembering their divine Husband for who He really is. Hosea says that they will come trembling – in repentance, knowing the wrong they have done, and asking for forgiveness. But there is more to this, and I’ll come to that soon.

The best is yet to come…

In this chapter of Hosea, we’ve seen two things: That an unfaithful wife was bought back at great cost, and that her husband would help her to be someone who would love him fully again. Does this story sound familiar?

“You see, at just the right time, when we were still powerless, Christ died for the ungodly… God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”

That’s Romans 5:6&8.

“At one time we too were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures… But when the kindness and love of God our Saviour appeared, he saved us, not because of the righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy. He saved us through the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Saviour, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life.”

That’s Titus 3:3-7.

You see, in verse 5 Hosea when talks about “the last days” he isn’t just looking for a time when Israel would be restored. No, he is talking about something beyond the Old Testament, looking forward to a time when God would fully restore His relationship with His people. He was looking forward to the time when God would buy an unfaithful people from a master that would drive them to death, paying a great cost, and making them His own people. A people who love and desire Him greatly.

We saw first that Hosea bought back his wife at great cost. And this is what God has done at the cross. Sin is not just breaking rules – it’s the breaking of a relationship. The breaking of God’s heart as His beloved people run after other lovers. As the Titus quote said, we were enslaved by desires and a broken nature that couldn’t help but be unfaithful to God. Like that Romans passage said, we were powerless to get ourselves out of the situation.  And just like Hosea had every right by the law to have his adulterous wife executed, that same law condemns us to death for our sin. Yet at this time, when we had rejected the God who created us, when we had turned to other things to satisfy our cravings for love or security or hope, at this time Jesus Christ died to free us from our slavery to sin. He swapped places with us so that we could be free from the punishment we deserve, and instead be made into God’s perfect bride. As 1 John 4:10 says, “This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and send his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.” Isn’t this the greatest display of love? God didn’t give up on the human race, even after we had rejected Him from the beginning, after the people He chose to display Him to the world consistently turned to other gods, and even now when those He has redeemed still fall by the wayside every so often.

If you aren’t a Christian, then please hear this. The relationship that God has with His people is not a cold contract of rules. It’s a living, breathing, vibrant relationship; one that satisfies our need to be known, to be accepted, to be loved. It’s a relationship that has cost God dearly to have. Isn’t that something worth thinking about?

For those of us who may think that we’re too broken for God to want anything to do with us, or know that we keep on getting things wrong and wonder whether we’re one mistake away from being abandoned, who know that secret darkness in the deepest corner of our heart – don’t disqualify yourself from coming to God. Jesus knew what He was doing when He died for you. And He came back from death so that you could be made whole again and be caught up in the life that He has. And don’t be fooled – these Christians may look like they’re all sorted and holy, but they’re not. I’m one of them, and I’m far from being the woman that I’d like to be. Becoming a Christian doesn’t instantly transform you into a perfect demi-god. It just starts the journey of being made right.

And God knows this. I find it incredibly moving that Jesus deliberately took the punishment for His unfaithful Bride upon Himself. That as He was taking those last excruciating breaths on the cross Jesus knew He was saving a people for Himself that wouldn’t get it right until He brought them to heaven. This is the greatness of God’s grace – that He knows we will hurt Him again, and forgives us anyway. He knows that before the day is out, I’ll have acted like something is more important than He is, probably done something to hurt the people I know and love, and definitely got something completely wrong, but still when I ask for forgiveness He can’t wait to give it. He is our heavenly Husband, who betrothed us to Himself at the cross, and again and again when we turn from Him He is ready to welcome us back with open arms. All we need to do is come trembling to the Lord, fully acknowledging our weakness and asking for Him to take away our wrongs, and trusting that He will forgive us like He’s promised.

The second thing we’ve seen in Hosea 3 is that Hosea had to guide Gomer away from running after other livers and bring her back into living as his wife. If you are a Christian, we’ve got a great warning and encouragement to take from this. We have been saved by Jesus from condemnation and judgment. He has given us His righteousness so that we have a good relationship with God. But we would be fooling ourselves to think that we’re all perfect now, wouldn’t we? The battle against sin in our hearts is still ongoing. I know that if I take a long, hard look at myself I won’t like what I see. Because I see that I do still have a heart that runs to things other than God. As human beings, we are very good at making things into idols and putting them in the place that God should have in our lives. And I find that this is still a problem now that I’m a Christian. It’s not just the obvious things that we can see people who aren’t Christians run after – things like money, or escapism, or success, or the dream house or family or car. More dangerous is when good things, sometimes God-things like having quiet times or serving at church or praying – anything that can become a box-ticking exercise – these become idols because we can easily fool ourselves that it’s out of some desire to please God that we care so much. But the thing is, idols consume you and leave you empty. They promise us everything, and give us nothing. Every time I sin – and I sin frequently – it’s because I think doing wrong is better than doing the right that pleases God. In that moment, I believe that I will get more satisfaction, more pleasure, by that thing rather than by loving God; whether it’s getting my own way, or not doing something because it puts me at risk of rejection, or giving in to that constant temptation because I just can’t keep fighting it any more.

We need to keep an eye on where our priorities lie because if you’re anything like me it’s all too easy to forget that it’s God, not my money or job or that relationship, who gives me joy and is worth everything. We’re on the right track, but the wheel of our proverbial trolley isn’t quite fixed yet. So we need to make sure that we aren’t led astray permanently. We should pursue God first and foremost, and if something is stopping that happening we need to do something about it. Also, we shouldn’t be afraid of times when God does take things away that distract us from Him, or when life gets hard, because He is growing us to be more faithful and could well be preparing us to be captivated by Him again.

As we’ve looked at Hosea 3, we’ve seen that Hosea buying back his unfaithful wife was meant to reflect God’s unrelenting love and forgiveness of His people; how God refused to give up on them despite their constant turning away from Him to other gods. And we’ve seen that God has bought us for Himself with the blood of Jesus, who died so that we could be forgiven.  And we’ve seen that, although we still do get things wrong, God forgives us time after time. He does not leave us to die in our sin, but welcomes us back to Him, and He will make His people to be a perfect Bride for Himself. A Bride who longs for Him, and who will enjoy perfect relationship with Him into eternity. In verse 5 what it says Israel will return to “the LORD and his blessings”. The blessing of relationship with Him now, and the future blessing of heaven – where there will be no more death, or evil, or anything that would cause us pain; where we will spend eternity with the Lover of our souls, seeing Him face to face, forever. This is what we have to look forward to! So let’s leave the empty seductions of this world and run towards the Husband who will give us more than we can dream of.

Again, I owe you an apology – I haven’t yet posted on Song of Songs. But that’s because I’ve been working on this. What follows is an adapted and extended version of a sermon I was asked to preach on singleness, a subject that is a personal struggle for me, but all the reading and listening to others’ wisdom and opening up the Bible on it as research for my talk has been a huge encouragement for me personally, and I hope it will be for you, too. So here it is!

 

The Church of England marriage service begins like this:

“Marriage is a gift of God in creation through which husband and wife may know the grace of God. It is given that as man and woman grow together in love and trust, they shall be united with one another in heart, body and mind, as Christ is united with his bride, the Church. The gift of marriage brings husband and wife together in the delight and tenderness of sexual union and joyful commitment to the end of their lives. It is given as the foundation of family life in which children are born and nurtured and in which each member of the family, in good times and in bad, may find strength, companionship and comfort, and grow to maturity in love.”

So often those of us who are single sit through the marriage services of friends and family and are delighted that they are entering in to such a fantastic thing. Yet we can end up thinking “But what about me?” We can just see a list of good things that we don’t, or might never, experience; and as much as we are genuinely overjoyed for the happy couple, the heart aches for what they have. It can be hard to be single in a world that tells you you’re abnormal if you aren’t in a relationship, or in churches that are more focussed on families than the unmarried. But we can’t afford to let that sadness have a death-grip on our lives. And churches can’t afford to neglect a section of society that’s increasing in size. Not while we’re called to live in relationship with God and make disciples of all people.

If we don’t have a proper perspective on singleness it becomes something that’s only ever seen as a waiting-room for marriage, a life-sentence of loneliness, or a dumping-ground for the undesirable. And that simply isn’t true. It’s a huge privilege to be able to share some of what I’ve learned because I have been so encouraged by it in my own struggles with being single. I hope and pray as we look at the Bible and what God says together, we shall all be refreshed by the incredible blessings that we have in Christ, and be spurred on to better love and serve our brothers and sisters in the church.

Before I come to our passage I’d like to give it some context so that we understand the full importance of what it says. In the Old Testament, God focussed His covenant-keeping faithfulness mainly on the people of Israel. Therefore being married and having children was very important for someone’s name and inheritance and for the preservation of God’s covenant people. To start with, God’s promise to Abraham was all about his physical offspring and descendants, and when He reaffirmed the promise to Abraham’s son Isaac in Genesis 26:3 He said “… I will be with you and will bless you. For to you and your descendants I will give all these lands and will confirm the oath I swore to your father Abraham.” In the Old Testament Law the system where a man would marry his dead brother’s wife to carry on the name of the brother was God providing for the continuation of the name through physical children. The most famous case of this was when Boaz agreed to marry Ruth to preserve the name of her father-in-law and husband (Ruth 4:10).

As you can see, marriage and having children were key in maintaining God’s covenant people, Israel. So to be single and childless back then was hugely humiliating. Yet this background makes our passage astonishing:

“Let no foreigner who is bound to the LORD say, ‘The LORD will surely exclude me from his people.’ And let no eunuch complain, ‘I am only a dry tree.’ For this is what the LORD says: ‘To the eunuchs who keep my Sabbaths, who choose what pleases me and hold fast to my covenant – to them I will give within my temple and its walls a memorial and a name better than sons and daughters; I will give them an everlasting name that will endure forever. And foreigners who bind themselves to the LORD to minister to him, to love the name of the LORD, and to be his servants, all who keep the Sabbath without desecrating it and who hold fast to my covenant – these I will bring to my holy mountain and give them joy in my house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house will be called a house of prayer for all nations.’”

(Isaiah 56:3-7)

This is all possible because of what Isaiah spoke about in chapter 53: the suffering of Christ. Isaiah 53:10 in the ESV says “… it was the LORD’s will to crush him and cause him to suffer, and though the LORD makes his life an offering for sin, he will see his offspring and prolong his days, and the will of the LORD will prosper in his hand.” When the Messiah dies as an “offering for sin” and rises again to “prolong his days” He will by that saving act produce many children – so the new people of God formed by the Messiah won’t be formed by physical procreation but by the atoning death of Jesus.

And this is why, straight after talking about how the Messiah will suffer, it says in Isaiah 54:1 “’Sing, O barren women, you who never bore a child; burst into song, shout for joy, you who were never in labour; because more are the children of the desolate woman than of her who has a husband.’ Says the LORD.” It’s also why Isaiah 56:5 in our passage says that unmarried covenant-keeping people will have “a memorial and a name better than sons and daughters” and “an everlasting name that will endure forever.” Can you see what this means? God promises people who keep God’s covenant, who love and worship Him – people who are in Christ – blessings that are better than the blessings of marriage and children. So what are these blessings? And how do they apply to singleness? I’m going to focus on two things that singleness isn’t and one that it is, but if you aren’t single, don’t switch off! These blessings apply to you too.

So, the blessings that we have firstly mean…

Singleness is not missing out – Isaiah 54:1-5

That singleness is not missing out. So often when single people hear about how great it is to be in a relationship, or to have a husband or wife, we can feel like there’s something big that we’re missing. “Oh, but it can be so hard being in a relationship,” our coupled friends say; and we think “yeah, right”. I even get it now; every so often I think “Oh no! I’m almost in my mid-twenties and still single; I’m on the shelf, nobody will ever love me and I’ll die ALONE as a CRAZY CAT LADY and NOBODY WILL NOTICE THAT I’M GONE!”

…Breathe…

There’s something really important that we need to get our heads around here. In Matthew 22:30 Jesus said, “At the resurrection [heaven] people will neither marry nor be given in marriage” – this means that marriage is a temporary thing. Let me say it again: marriage is not eternal. I won’t lie, the first time I came across this I refused to believe it – marriage had become such a huge thing for me that I hoped that even if I didn’t get married in this life, I could get married in heaven. After all, I’d have an eternity to find a husband! Surely SOMEONE would want me, right? But when we get to heaven, there won’t be marriage because the thing it points to will be a reality.

Let’s skip back a couple of chapters to Isaiah 54:

“’Sing, O barren woman, you who never bore a child; burst into song, shout for joy, you who were never in labour; because more are the children of the desolate woman than of her who has a husband.’… ‘For your Maker is your husband – the LORD Almighty is his name – the Holy One of Israel is your Redeemer; he is called the God of all the earth.’”

(Isaiah 54:1, 4-5)

Marriage points to the complete intimacy and union that we have with God – partially now, but completely in heaven – so when we get to heaven, there will be no more need for the picture of union with Christ because it will be a complete reality. This means that if you aren’t married, you aren’t missing out on the big picture. And if you are married, you get to enjoy a foretaste of what is to come. We shouldn’t idolise marriage and put it above our relationship with God, because that is the prize we’re all headed for.

At this point I can imagine some of you (especially the men) might think “Hang on there! God is my husband? Isn’t that a bit weird?” Keep going with me here. Think about what it is to be a husband – the depth of love for a wife, the depth of concern, the long-term commitment, the longing to protect and provide and pursue – that’s what God feels for His people. For you. And women, think about what you long for from a husband in affirmation, protection, comfort, every part of you being known and loved – that’s what God gives us in our relationship with Him. And this is my greatest comfort when it aches to be unattached; knowing that the God who created the cosmos loves me. Loves me – honours, protects, comforts, and is faithful to me for better, worse, richer, poorer, sickness and health. He loves me. And you.

So if you are single, when you see a couple together and long for that kind of relationship, when you ache for good things like commitment, or children, or just for someone to know your heart and love you as you are, remember this. The most precious, the closest, the most faithful relationship you have is the one you have with God. Cry out to Him, because He cares for you and Jesus knows what it’s like to be single. And pursue that relationship with Him – rejoice in it, spend quality time with God, talk to Him in prayer, and eagerly wait for the day when you will see Him as He truly is, face to face. The same goes for those who aren’t single. Our identity is in Christ, not our relationship status. And we need to be careful about saying things like “I feel sorry for the girls at such-and-such a church, there aren’t enough eligible young men for them”, or “How are they still single?”, or even trying to play matchmaker to our single friends. These things might seem harmless, but they undermine people’s confidence in their identity in Christ and assume that people aren’t fulfilled unless they have an “other half”. God does not promise us an earthly husband or wife; He promises us Himself. So we should be constantly pointing each other to and encouraging each other in such a priceless blessing.

As the 17th Century minister Richard Baxter once said:

“Is it a small thing in your eyes to be loved by God? To be the child, the spouse, the love, the delight, of the king of glory? Christian, believe this and think about it. You will be eternally embraced in the arms of the love which was from everlasting and will extend to everlasting. Of the love which brought the Son of God’s love from heaven to earth, from the earth to the cross, from the cross to the grave, and from the grave to glory. That love which was hungry, weary, tempted, scorned, scourged, buffeted, spit upon, crucified, pierced. That love which fasted, prayed, taught, healed, wept, sweat, bled, and died. That love will eternally embrace you.”

It’s worth mentioning physical intimacy here. It isn’t easy to talk about, but it can be hard to be a Christian single with a sex drive. We know that sex within marriage is a great and beautiful thing, but can’t enjoy it ourselves unless we are married. How do we deal with it? If you remember back to our Autumn series on Song of Songs Henry talked about the greater truth sex points to. Since marriage is a reflection of Christ and the Church, the complete unity and intimacy of sex is the only metaphor strong enough to describe the intimate relationship that Christians have with God. So when you struggle with a desire for sex that you can do nothing about, remember what it points to and thank God that our need for love and intimacy are ultimately fulfilled in our relationship with Him.

Being single isn’t missing out on a thing. One of our great blessings is that we have a relationship with God that answers our need for personal intimacy; a relationship that marriage can at best only ever reflect. The only people missing out here are those who don’t know Jesus.

Singleness does not mean being alone – 1 Peter 4:8-10

Secondly, singleness does not mean being alone. A common pang felt by lots of single people is loneliness. Sometimes it’s not about wanting dates or flowers or a ring; sometimes it’s a case of just wanting another person to do things with. Someone to cook for, to go for walks with, share a relaxing night in with, or just to come home to after work.

Loneliness has been described as “the painful feeling of separation from an unacceptability to others” – but we have been made acceptable by Jesus’ death and resurrection eradicating our sin, and so we aren’t separated from God. Not only is our relationship with God restored; He has given us a family and community where we are accepted in the Church. And we should remember that this family is not only spiritual, but eternal. We’ll all be in heaven together. Doesn’t this make our relationships with other believers important? Next time you’re at church, have a good look around you. These people you see are, first and foremost, your brothers and sisters in Christ. So we should treat each other like the spiritual family that we are.

So what does it look like to be a family? 1 Peter 4:8-10 says:

“Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling. Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.”

It looks like loving deeply, offering hospitality, and serving each other.

How members of the church relate to each other shows the world that our lives are focussed on God, and that our relationships aren’t only defined by family or peer group, but by Christ. So being a family for each other is about worshipping and displaying Jesus to the world as well as being about being there for each other. For the sake of His name, and for the love of each other, we should be interested in each other’s’ lives. We should care about what other people at our churches do, how they really are, and what they think about things. And we should especially care about their relationship with God (because it’s so important!).

As someone who doesn’t have one automatic go-to person about anything, it’s been so helpful for me to have a small group of close friends who know me well and who I have a lot of respect and affection for. And they aren’t all women. We can sometimes be over-cautious about close male-female relationships and it is important to keep our friendships at an appropriate level of closeness. But guys and girls can be friends without wanting to marry each other! Too often our culture tells us that if people are close, they’re sleeping together. But the Bible celebrates close, intimate and committed friendships like that of Naomi and Ruth, and Jonathan and David, which weren’t sexual at all.

We are called to love each other deeply, and we can do this by offering hospitality to each other. It doesn’t have to be limited to formal dinner parties. Sometimes it can be as simple as inviting people over to watch Eurovision together, or as fun as going on a day trip together, or as everyday as walking to lectures together. It’s about taking the opportunity to invite people to share in your life. Over the last few years I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know a couple at my church quite well, and I can’t tell you how much of a privilege it’s been to be invited to share time with them as a family, grabbing a quick dinner between work and Prayer & Praise, or hanging out on a Sunday afternoon, or holding the baby for a few minutes to give them some free hands!

This is a challenge to both single and married people – make the effort to open your home and your lives to others. We should all throw ourselves into this community called Church. Single people, don’t isolate yourselves. Non-single people, remember that it can be hard to be the single person in a room full of couples. Students, think about putting down roots and building relationships where you are now. Everyone, remember that all types of people can feel lonely, and think about who you could have a meaningful friendship with over the next few years. Who has God put into your life that you can encourage?

These kinds of relationships also answer the question of future security. We know that God as a plan for each of our lives, and has promised us a glorious future in heaven, but we can still worry about the practical parts of life between now and then. When you think about it, in a spouse and a family you have an automatic next of kin and someone to look after you when you’re old. Single people don’t naturally have this. If I were to be knocked over by a car, who would I get the paramedics to call? My parents? My housemates? My boss? My vicar? If I’m stuck in hospital for weeks on end, who will visit me? Who will look after me if I can’t look after myself? If I’m sent to be a missionary abroad, who will I go with? I can think about these questions and feel so alone in the world. But this is where my church family comes in, and this is why it’s so important to nurture close friendships with them. Because as a church we’re called to look after each other and to be there for each other.

So we’ve seen that being single does not mean that you’re missing out on a close relationship because that’s exactly what we have with God. And it doesn’t mean that you have to be lonely because you are a part of a close and eternal family that is the Church. These are huge blessings! Now let’s look at one thing that singleness is.

Singleness is a great opportunity – 1 Corinthians 7

We’re called to serve each other, and singleness is a fantastic opportunity to do this.

1 Corinthians 7:6-8 says:

“I say this as a concession, not as a command. I wish that all of you were as I am [meaning single]. But each of you has your own gift from God; one has this gift, another has that.” And if we skip down to verses 32-34 Paul says why: “I would like you to be free from concern. An unmarried man is concerned about the Lord’s affairs – how he can please the Lord. But a married man is concerned about the affairs of this world – how he can please his wife – and his interests are divided. An unmarried woman or virgin is concerned about the Lord’s affairs: Her aim is to be devoted to the Lord in both body and spirit. But a married woman is concerned about the affairs of this world – how she can please her husband.”

Single people have more time and energy to give than married people, because a married person’s spouse and children rightfully get first dibs at their free time. This doesn’t mean that they are less of a Christian or that it’s bad to be married, it just means that we single people have a great opportunity before us.

Did you notice that it talked about singleness (or marriage) as a gift there? The idea of the “gift of singleness” is one that’s been misunderstood as some form of special inner peace over being single where you don’t ever want to get married. That isn’t what Paul’s talking about. The Greek word he uses that’s translated as “gift” here (that’s “charisma” for you Greek geeks) carries the sense of being enabled to do something. The same word is used in 1 Corinthians 12:4-7: “There are different kinds of gifts, but the same Spirit distributes them. There are different kinds of service, but the same Lord. There are different kinds of working, but in all of them and in everyone it is the same God at work. Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good.” And it then lists a whole load of different gifts. This means that, as a gift, singleness is an empowerment to serve the Church in a particular way. As 1 Peter 4:10 said earlier, “Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.”

Because God gives to each of us the gifts He wants to give us, people aren’t single because they are too old or ugly or there aren’t enough young men or women to go round. And this doesn’t mean that people are married because they’re in some way better than the single people. People are single or married because that’s where God wants them. That’s the opportunity He’s given them to serve. And God gives us the gifts He gives us “for the common good” – to bless and build each other up. Therefore singleness isn’t a waiting-room until someday my prince comes and I can start living life; singleness is an opportunity to bless my church right here, right now. And that’s what I’ve found over the last couple of years. If I had been married, I wouldn’t have been able to be an intern at my church last year and get into serving in the music team as much as I have been able to. I wouldn’t be able to spend as much time writing this sermon as I have, because I should rightly have spent some of that free time with my hypothetical husband. I couldn’t have people over for dinner as much, or agree to go for a coffee with a friend at 10 minutes’ notice. I’m not saying that they should be doing too much, but that single people can invest much more time, energy and flexibility into relationships and ministries.

So the challenge is to do it! Single people, what can you use your free time for? Could you invite newcomers over for dinner to help them feel more at home? Could you get involved in serving on a Sunday? Could you help out at the church toddler group? Could you celebrate the end of exams with friends and stay in touch over the summer? Are you investing in others’ lives? Could you take on a one-to-one pastoring role? Or visit the elderly, or help lead a housegroup, or start up a new ministry? And to the rest of us there’s a challenge too: How are we empowering single people to glorify God with their free time and energy? Are we encouraging those serving in church? Are we mentoring them so that they are equipped and trained to serve? Are we giving them opportunities or inviting them to get involved? And are we affirming their value as single people in Christ and their value as members of our church family?

Another fact is that single people can display truths about God that married people can’t. Because we are a part of the Church, we show that God’s family grows through people turning to Him in faith and not by Christian couples having children. Because of the close relationship we have with God, and because we wait for when we will see Him in heaven, we show that marriage is a reflection of something eternal and much greater. And if we live lives faithful to our Saviour, we show that He gives us value and our identity. Marriage shows the passion and exclusivity of our relationship with Christ as His bride; singleness shows the inclusivity of the offer of salvation and love and community that God sets before all people.

Conclusion

So we’ve seen that as God’s people we are promised blessings that are far better than marriage and children. We’ve seen that the great relationship that we have with God means that single people aren’t missing out on a personal and close relationship. We’ve seen that the spiritual family that God has given us in the Church means that singleness is not about being alone. And we’ve seen that singleness can be seen as a great opportunity to bless our church and proclaim truths about God in ways that married people can’t.

Singleness is in no way a Plan B or falling short of the best in life. Our challenge here is to live up to our calling as God’s people to love Him, love others, and proclaim the Gospel with our lives.

You can listen to the original sermon here: http://stmaryswollatonpark.co.uk/podcast/?p=episode&name=2013-05-28_singleness.mp3

Here are a couple of questions that I would have liked to answer in my talk, but ran out of time:

Are there good times to be alone? Yes. Some people naturally need time away from others to emotionally recharge, but this doesn’t mean that time alone is only for introverts. There are good things about solitude, because it isn’t about avoiding people or escaping from the world, but a spiritual discipline where you intentionally spend time alone with God. God is always with us, but we need to consciously focus on Him and spend quality time with Him. It’s during these times that we can reflect on things, and often God shows us things about Himself and ourselves that help us in our own growth.

But solitude also makes us appreciate community more. Al Hsu says:

“The antidote to aloneness and alienation is community. While it is good for us to develop solitude, we are not meant to stay alone all the time. We are social beings, designed to live in relationship with others. While some may genuinely prefer to live solitary, isolated lives, most of us yearn to belong to a group and have a place where we are acknowledged and needed… Fellowship with God is the solution for loneliness. Companionship with fellow Christians is the cure for aloneness. Our identity with Christ, though personal and individual, is also corporate and communal. The discipline of solitude should not isolate us – solitude should move us toward community. Solitude actually helps us appreciate people more. Solitude and community are two parallel disciplines, two sides of the same coin, which need to be held in balance.” (The Single Issue p.138)

 

What if you have a good theology of singleness, you love your close relationship with God and are content to be in whatever situation He puts you in, but still want to be married? How do you deal with what seems like a conflict of desires? Well, it isn’t wrong to pray for a spouse. Tell God what you truly want, and don’t worry about praying the “wrong” prayer, because He knows what’s good for you. And actually, as we pray and really do pour out our hearts to God, we find that He changes our hearts. If, in our aching, we press into Him and say by our actions that we choose to put Him first; in this worship, He changes us to be more like Christ. So talk to God about it, and then trust Him. Trust that God will give you what you need in the situation that He’s put you in. Also, be aware that marriage can become an idol when our vision of God is too small. We obsess about things because God doesn’t have the place that He should have in our hearts. It’s been said that we have a “hole” in our hearts that’s designed for God to fill. And if our vision of Him is too small then He won’t fill it, and that hole will just churn out desires that become controlling obsessions and idols. It seems counter-intuitive, but the way to fight such desires isn’t to try and make yourself not want them but to focus on something else, something much greater. Focus on knowing and loving God, and delighting in Him, and He will change those desires in such a way that they will be satisfied in Him.

And let me say that out of experience, it does hurt sometimes. You can know these good things and love God, and enjoy being able to serve with your free time, but being single still aches. And I know that in heaven all my deepest desires will be satisfied in seeing my Saviour face-to-face, but heaven is a lifetime away. So far, and so long to wait! Sometimes I just have to carry that burden, but I know that Jesus will help me bear it. And I know that between now and Glory there will be joy as well as pain. And I know that heaven will be all the sweeter for having known my God closely now, and having my longing for more completely satisfied when I get there.

You can listen to the original talk here: http://stmaryswollatonpark.co.uk/podcast/?p=episode&name=2013-05-28_singleness.mp3

Here’s a list of the things I listened to and read (you’ll see some shameless pinching of wisdom!):

Paige Benton Brown’s article on singleness: http://www.pcpc.org/ministries/singles/singledout.php – kind of kick started my thinking on singleness and God’s goodness.

The Single Issue by Al Hsu (IVP) – lots of practical application of how to “do” singleness in a Godly way.

John Piper’s talk “Single in Christ: A Name Better Than Sons and Daughters”: http://www.desiringgod.org/resource-library/sermons/single-in-christ-a-name-better-than-sons-and-daughters – that’s where I got the main theology from.

Piper’s book This Momentary Marriage (Crossway) is free online. Its chapter on singleness is basically the talk above, but it’s also got some stuff in chapter 10 about the relationship between married couples and single people.

Carolyn McCulley’s talk on “Singleness and Sanctification”: http://www.desiringgod.org/resource-library/conference-messages/singleness – more practical stuff on how to live out singleness.

Short article on longing to be married based on podcasts asking John Piper questions: http://www.desiringgod.org/resource-library/ask-pastor-john/how-can-i-long-to-be-married-without-obsessing-about-it

Article by Marshall Segal on “Mission for the Not Yet Married”: http://www.desiringgod.org/blog/posts/single-satisfied-and-sent-mission-for-the-not-yet-married

Another Carolyn McCulley talk on “Biblical Femininity for Single Women”: http://www.desiringgod.org/resource-library/conference-messages/were-not-on-hold-biblical-femininity-for-single-women – she’s got a load of good stuff to say!

Tim Keller’s book The Meaning of Marriage (Hodder & Stoughton) has a helpful chapter on singleness as well.

Something really helpful that was published since I wrote this sermon is this article about how it’s not wrong to have a sex drive when you’re single, and also how we can deal with it (for want of a better phrase) in a pure way: http://www.desiringgod.org/blog/posts/the-single-person-s-good-desire-for-sex

OK, I promise I’ll post the Song of Songs stuff soon (hopefully!) – it’s just taking me ages to write it. In the meantime….

Humans are relational people. As the famous saying goes, “no man is an island”. And our friends are important to us – can you think of the people you couldn’t live without? On the internet someone has predicted that we meet on average about 100,000 people in our lifetime[1]. That’s a lot of people! But not all of them will be our friends. We have circles of friends, best friends, and acquaintances, with different levels of closeness with each person we know. We love different people differently, too. I wonder who your closest friend in the world is; the person, or people, who you love the most?

1 Samuel 20 focusses on the relationship between King Saul’s son, Jonathan, and the David who we know was later to become king of Israel. But first, let’s look at a bit of background.

Saul was Israel’s first king, and had failed in his duty to be faithful to God. So God rejected him as king, and instead chose David to be the next king of Israel. David was a nobody, a shepherd boy from the backwater of Bethlehem, but God chose him because of his heart after God. He blessed him with success – first in his defeat of Goliath, and then in victories as a commander of Israel’s army. But Saul became jealous of this upstart shepherd boy, and several times in the previous two chapters had tried to kill him. At the beginning of chapter 20, David has just fled from one of Saul’s attempts on his life. Jonathan’s response to David was much different to his father’s. He became close friends with David, and formalised their friendship in a covenant where he symbolically handed the kingdom over to David.

This passage is huge, so I won’t quote the whole thing here. But here’s the basic story:

At the beginning of this passage, Saul has once again tried to take David’s life, so David has run away. He goes up to Jonathan and asks why Saul wants him dead (v1). Jonathan won’t believe that his father wants to kill David, but David insists that Saul is trying to kill him and makes a plan to prove Saul’s hatred. The next day is the start of the New Moon festival, where, as a member of the court, David was expected to attend the feast. David plans to not go, and make an excuse about having to be elsewhere. If he is missed, he asks Jonathan to tell Saul that he had to go home. Saul’s reaction will show whether he really does hate David and want him dead. In case David and Jonathan can’t be seen speaking to each other, they invent a cunning way of communicating. The New Moon festival arrives, and, sure enough, David’s place at the feast is empty. To start with, Saul thinks nothing of this, since it wasn’t unusual for people to miss such an event because of accidentally becoming ceremonially unclean. But on the second day of David’s absence, Saul askes Jonathan why David isn’t there. Jonathan gives David’s excuse, and Saul explodes in anger – not just at David, but at Jonathan as well! He even tries to kill his own son in his anger! Jonathan now knows beyond a doubt that his father hates David, and the next day goes to tell David of this.

As we look at Jonathan and David’s friendship, we’re going to see what this passage shows us about God, what it shows about Jesus (or, rather, the correct response to Him), and what we can learn from it. Let’s start by looking at what this passage shows us about God.

There is no “God did this” or “God did that” explicitly in this text, but can you see how God is at work behind the scenes? To start with, God is keeping His servant safe. He has protected David thus far from Saul’s anger and now is using Jonathan to protect him. Not only is God providing safety for David, but He has given David a faithful friend in Jonathan. Because of Saul’s public statement that David must die in verse 31, he now has to leave his home and his place at court, and is on the run from the authorities. In all of this, God provides a friend for David who has promised love and protection. Thirdly, God is securing His sovereign plan. David was the man that God had chosen to be the next king of Israel. Where Saul had failed as God’s servant, David was intended to succeed. David wasn’t perfect, but he was a man after God’s heart and a foreshadowing of God’s true King, Jesus Christ. God used David as part of His promises to His people, and by keeping David safe, He was carrying out His own plan for salvation.

So that’s what we can see about God. Let’s now look at what we can see about Jesus here. There isn’t so much in this passage about Jesus explicitly. However, we can have a look at Jonathan’s relationship with David as God’s promised king, and see if this has any relevance for us since David was foreshadowing Christ. David wasn’t just Jonathan’s covenant close friend. Jonathan knew that God’s plan was to have David as the next king. And, where his father rejected God’s plan and hated David, Jonathan accepted what God was doing and loved David.

Saul knew that God had rejected him as king, and was jealous of David’s success and rise in popularity. He hated David so much that when talking with Jonathan at the feast he won’t even say David’s name! He treats David shamefully, as it says in v34, and his anger is uncontrollable to the point of trying to kill his own son for defending David (v33).

Jonathan, instead of hating David, loved him. He knew that God had chosen David to be the next king of Israel, which was why he symbolically handed over the kingdom to him in the covenant in chapter 18, and has promised to protect him now. Jonathan saw God’s plan and submitted to it, whereas Saul railed against it. Throughout the passage we see David and Jonathan’s close friendship – to start with, Jonathan says that if Saul wanted to kill David, he would tell him (and he has done so in the previous chapter). Although he doubts whether his father wants to kill David, he still agrees to follow through on David’s plan to test Saul’s motives. He also agrees to protect David, working out a way to communicate with him in case it is dangerous for David to be seen.  He was a loyal friend to David, defending him when Saul’s anger flared up against him; and Jonathan was livid at Saul’s treatment of his friend. And when David had to leave, the friends’ grief showed their affection for one another. So Jonathan not only submitted to God’s plan, but he also loved God’s king.

We’ve had a look at what we see of God in this passage, and we’ve seen Jonathan’s reaction to God’s new king. Now we come on to looking at what this means for us.

There are three applications that we can draw from what we’ve seen here. The first application here is from what we’ve seen about God preserving His plan in these events. Even the smaller details of the events here, which to David and Jonathan must have seemed very distant to God’s big picture at the time, were all part of God’s outworking for His Sovereign plan for salvation. You see, God works in the big picture, and He works in the details, and each these are never separate from other. God has the holy ingenuity to weave His plan and our lives together. Isn’t this great? And since God Himself is behind it all, we know that we can trust in what He is doing, no matter how dire life might seem at the time.

The second application here comes from Jonathan’s submission to God’s plan and love for God’s king, which made him willing to give everything up for him. His position as crown prince means a lot in the world – with wealth, power, and influence, it is one of the highest positions a person can have. Yet he gave it all over for the sake of God’s plan and God’s king. How readily do we give all we have to Jesus? I find it all too easy to say that I’ll give everything to God, but when it comes to that money, that dream for my future, or even that sin, I want to cling to them. If God wants it, He’ll have to prize it out of my hands. My life is relatively comfortable, and I may say that I’m willing to sacrifice what I have for the sake of the Gospel, but I know that when the rubber hits the road I’m more likely to walk away rather than stand up for Jesus. We can easily forget that God is carrying out His Sovereign plan today. And when we forget this, it’s easier to want to hold on to our own little kindgoms – maybe our reputation, or that job we want, or that relationship we hope for – instead of surrendering them to Jesus.

The third, and main, application, is this: Jonathan loved God’s promised king. He showed it formally in his covenants with David, but also personally in his relationship with him. There is obviously a close brotherly affection in how David and Jonathan interact – they trust each other, Jonathan defends David to his father, and Jonathan protects David’s life. Obviously, Jesus doesn’t need us like David needed his friend, but can you see the challenge to love, to trust, to devote ourselves to Jesus like Jonathan was devoted to David? How personal is our relationship with Jesus? Is it just a formal declaration of love that we give in our songs and prayers on a Sunday, or do we live like Jesus is actually a person, our Friend as well as our Redeemer and King, who is with us every day till the end of the age? How much do we talk to our King? How honest are we with Him? We can devote ourselves to Jesus in prayer, in trust, in standing firm in our faith and telling others the Gospel.

Jonathan had great love and devotion for God’s promised king, David. And this is a foreshadowing of how we should love God’s King, Jesus. We should be devoted to our King, who is also our Friend and Saviour. Jesus deserves our hearts and our lives, and there is no sweeter thing than giving everything to our King to gain eternity with Him.

I’m lacking creativity to write a catchy title for this one. But reading “Epaphras” so many times brings to mind how my friend says it. Epaphras was a friend of the apostle Paul, and you’ll read more about him in my talk. Blondie was writing and giving sermons on Colossians when I was, but instead of saying “Ee-paf-ras” like most normal people, she, in her soft-but-still-northern Yorkshire accent would go “Eeeeeh-paf-ras”, as in “Eeh-by-gum-paf-ras”. We both did a lot of Colossians, and every time I just couldn’t get over the “Eeeh-by-gum”. Sorry Blondie. At least I didn’t tell you while you were doing it.

I’m not gonna lie – this is one of my earliest sermons so it’s probably not my best. But no matter how badly wrapped the message may be, the truth of the Bible is the same. So please try to see past my clunky writing as we dive in…

Bungee jumping is ridiculous. To me, the idea of flinging yourself off a high ledge with nothing but a piece of rope to stop you becoming human porridge on the floor is insane. So much trust goes into that rope, and stories like the one last week don’t fill me with confidence about the sport. I remember last year there was a news story where a woman’s bungee cord failed whilst she was jumping over a crocodile-infested river. Thankfully, she managed to swim out of the river and was ok. But when something as important as the bungee rope fails, the jumper is in serious trouble, to put it mildly.

There are many things that we trust, to varying degrees. We trust the floor beneath our feet to hold us up, we trust our alarm clocks to wake us up in the morning; we rely on our friends and family and trust in their love. We also trust that what we are taught at school and university, and by our parents, is true. There are certain things that we trust which are fundamental to us, and like a failed bungee cord it’s terrifying when it seems like they aren’t true. What are the most important things we trust in? And how can we be confident that they are trustworthy?

I’m going to be talking on Colossians 1:1-8, and I hope that as we explore this passage we will see that we can be confident that the most important thing that we trust in, the Gospel, is true. Let’s have a read of the passage:

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother,

To the holy and faithful brothers in Christ at Colosse:

Grace and peace to you from God our Father.

We always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, when we pray for you, because we have heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love you have for all the saints – the faith and love that spring from the hope that is stored up for you in heaven and that you have already heard about in the word of truth, the gospel that has come to you. All over the world this gospel is bearing fruit and growing, just as it has been doing among you since the day you heard it and understood God’s grace in all its truth. You learned it from Epaphras, our dear fellow-servant, who is a faithful minister of Christ on our behalf, and who also told us of your love in the Spirit.

–  Colossians 1:1-8

As we can see from the first two verses, the apostle Paul is writing to the church in Colosse. Colosse was a small city in the Lycus Valley area of what is now Turkey. It was about 120 miles southwest of Ephesus. The church in Colosse began during a period of evangelism linked with Paul’s ministry in Ephesus in 52-55AD, and which is recorded in Acts 19. It was started by a man called Epaphras, who was from Colosse himself, and brought the Gospel back home as Paul’s associate/representative. Paul is writing to the Colossians probably in 60/61AD, during his time in Rome. Epaphras had visited Paul in Rome and told him about the churches in the Lycus valley such as Ephesus and Colosse. He must have mentioned the recent introduction of a false teaching at Colosse which could undermine the Gospel and prove dangerous for the Church. What we will see from the rest of Colossians is that this false teaching basically said that you had to obey certain rules to gain what they called “true knowledge”. To correct this, Paul wrote to the young Colossian church.

His greeting in verses 1-3 is fairly normal for the time; stating the author, the recipient, and a greeting. Paul states his credentials as an apostle (literally meaning “someone sent”) of Jesus, as he does in his other letters. He also mentions Timothy, probably because he was with him at the time. He then addresses the Christians at Colosse as being “holy and faithful brothers in Christ” (v3). He is affirming their faith throughout this first section, encouraging them that they can be confident in the Gospel they know.

After his greeting, Paul goes on to mention his thanks to God for the Colossians. He says that “we always thank God… when we pray for you” (v3). If you notice, he says “when we pray for you.” This implies frequent prayer for the Colossian church – even though he hasn’t met them. When he does pray for them, he thanks God for their faith in Jesus and the love they have for “all the saints” (v4). I’ll come back to this later; but if you notice, both the Colossians’ faith and love for their Christian family come from “the hope that is stored up… in heaven” (v5). This hope is the hope of salvation and right standing with God that they have in Jesus. This is something the Colossians can be confident in, because it is stored up for them in heaven, as Paul says in verse 5. It is kept safe where it cannot be touched by any that would seek to destroy it or take it away. And this is the same hope that we have! We believe that we are saved through faith in Jesus’ death and resurrection for us, and here we see that the inheritance that we will enjoy is safe.

Paul mentions that the Colossians had heard about this hope through the preaching of the Gospel. You see, the problem is not that they haven’t heard the Gospel properly – Paul describes Epaphras as a “faithful minister of Christ” in verse 7, so he would have given them a faithful and true account of how Jesus had saved them – no, the problem is that some dodgy new teaching had crept into the Colossian church. This teaching could have confused them and caused them to doubt whether they were saved at all, because it was saying that you needed more than just faith to receive all the blessings we have in Christ. But Paul is stating here that the Colossians already know the truth, because they have been taught it by Epaphras, and that they can be confident in it. Why? Because the Gospel was spreading around the known world, as Paul says in verse 6, bearing fruit and growing. And it was doing this in their church as well. This is something alive, something growing. Something that is obviously Spirit-empowered as shown by its progress, against all odds at times. Paul is saying, “look, you know this already and it is true.” He is showing them that they are saved, because of what can be seen in them. He is beginning to suggest that the truth which they have already been taught is worth trusting in, and Paul will pick up on this thread throughout the rest of the letter.

So, Paul has described how the Colossians can be confident in what they have been taught already about Jesus and their hope of salvation. And we know that this had a visible effect: Epaphras told Paul about the Colossians’ faith and love, which resulted from their hope. It makes sense that faith follows on from hope – we believe in this hope that we have. But I wonder whether we consider our love for fellow-Christians to come from the hope that we have? I know that I hadn’t really thought about it before studying this passage. Yet the hope stored up for us in heaven, the fact that by trusting in Jesus we are given right standing with God and become His children, should spark a love in us for our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ as well as, faith. We know that we are saved by grace, and we know the imperfect condition of our own hearts. God’s Holy Spirit lives in us, and He empowers us to love others; especially the eclectic bunch of other imperfect people that we now call our spiritual family! And since this love and faith “spring” from our hope, they are a sign that we are saved by God.

We have seen that Paul confirmed that the Colossians could be confident in the Gospel, and that their faith and love came from their hope. He confirms that he can see that they are saved, in preparation for his rebuff of false teaching in the rest of his letter. So, we can be confident in our trust of the same Gospel that we believe in. And we can encourage one another, if, or maybe when, we struggle with assurance – we can encourage our brothers and sisters in Christ, reminding them of the things we have seen in them that show their faith.

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